The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic: Gallery 1 – Images from 2014

This portfolio contains 2014 images from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic.

For earlier images from the project, see The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic : Gallery 2 [2006 – 2013]

To view a larger image click on the gallery image.

Saami Home, Titovka, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. This shows a contemporary version of a traditional Saami home. The Saami peoples, formerly known as Lapps, have traditionally inhabited the far northern regions of Sweden, Finland, and Norway, and the extreme northwest corner of Russia. This image was taken between Sputnik, Russia, a military town, and Murmansk, the largest town in the Arctic, with a population of about 330,000. Titovka, where the home is, is a very small hamlet along the side of the northernmost highway in the world, running about 100 miles between Kirkenes, Norway and Murmansk, Russia. Saami parliaments have been set up in the last 30 years in Sweden, Norway, and Finland to represent their interests in these nations. Russia has a non-governmental organization that advocates for its indigenous peoples.
Saami Home, Titovka, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. This shows a contemporary version of a traditional Saami home. The Saami peoples, formerly known as Lapps, have traditionally inhabited the far northern regions of Sweden, Finland, and Norway, and the extreme northwest corner of Russia. This image was taken between Sputnik, Russia, a military town, and Murmansk, the largest town in the Arctic, with a population of about 330,000. Titovka, where the home is, is a very small hamlet along the side of the northernmost highway in the world, running about 100 miles between Kirkenes, Norway and Murmansk, Russia. Saami parliaments have been set up in the last 30 years in Sweden, Norway, and Finland to represent their interests in these nations. Russia has a non-governmental organization that advocates for its indigenous peoples.

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Home, Sea, and Mountains, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014 Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. This image shows a typical home on a hill above the frozen sea in Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik). Pond Inlet, or Mittimatilik, is primarily Inuit. It is the largest of Earth's four Arctic hamlets above the 72nd parallel of latitude, with a population of 1500. A sled is visible in the image, widely used for hunting and fishing, along with a snowmobile, far down on the ice. Snowmobiles have been increasingly used for transportation on the Arctic ice.


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Home, Sea, and Mountains, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, from Arctic Communities, 2014 Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. This image shows a typical home on a hill above the frozen sea in Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik). Pond Inlet, or Mittimatilik, is primarily Inuit. It is the largest of Earth’s four Arctic hamlets above the 72nd parallel of latitude, with a population of 1500. A sled is visible in the image, widely used for hunting and fishing, along with a snowmobile, far down on the ice. Snowmobiles have been increasingly used for transportation on the Arctic ice.

Qamutiqs and Iceberg, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.  Qamutiqs are sleds built for hunting and fishing using traditional Inuit knowledge. These are in Pond Inlet, on the far north of Baffin Island (Mittimatalik), across the sea from Greenland. The iceberg in the background is still frozen in place in mid-June, in an inlet of the Arctic Ocean. I walked, very carefully, over the frozen ocean toward the iceberg and observed a person in a snowmobile going to the iceberg and chipping away ice and then leaving with the ice. Many Inuit believe that ice from an iceberg makes the best tea. Walking on the frozen ocean is treacherous. It is slowly melting for the summer. Traces of ocean appear in long cracks. These are called leads. If you are not careful when walking on the frozen sea you fall into a lead, into the extremely frigid water, and die.
Qamutiqs and Iceberg, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. Qamutiqs are sleds built for hunting and fishing using traditional Inuit knowledge. These are in Pond Inlet, on the far north of Baffin Island (Mittimatalik), across the sea from Greenland. The iceberg in the background is still frozen in place in mid-June, in an inlet of the Arctic Ocean. I walked, very carefully, over the frozen ocean toward the iceberg and observed a person in a snowmobile going to the iceberg and chipping away ice and then leaving with the ice. Many Inuit believe that ice from an iceberg makes the best tea. Walking on the frozen ocean is treacherous. It is slowly melting for the summer. Traces of ocean appear in long cracks. These are called leads. If you are not careful when walking on the frozen sea you fall into a lead, into the extremely frigid water, and die.

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Children Playing, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.  These children were playing in Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik in the Inuktitut language, meaning "nice little inlet"). Clyde River is on Baffin Island, across the sea from Greenland. It is small, with a population of 930. Like most Arctic communities it is not connected to any other community by road. The only means of transport are snowmobile, sleds, all terrain vehicle, and air, with boats possible for several months a year. A guide in Clyde River that took me on a snowmobile had lost his uncle in a snowmobile accident. The only other snowmobile guide I had while photographing for the project, in Kugluktuk, Nunavut, had his father die in a snowmobile accident. Clyde River is so small that it has only one hotel, with six rooms. The people are friendly there. They do not often see outsiders. Half the population of Clyde River is under 18. Clyde River is surrounded by fjords that stretch to an ice cap.
Children Playing, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. These children were playing in Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik in the Inuktitut language, meaning “nice little inlet”). Clyde River is on Baffin Island, across the sea from Greenland. It is small, with a population of 930. Like most Arctic communities it is not connected to any other community by road. The only means of transport are snowmobile, sleds, all terrain vehicle, and air, with boats possible for several months a year. A guide in Clyde River that took me on a snowmobile had lost his uncle in a snowmobile accident. The only other snowmobile guide I had while photographing for the project, in Kugluktuk, Nunavut, had his father die in a snowmobile accident. Clyde River is so small that it has only one hotel, with six rooms. The people are friendly there. They do not often see outsiders. Half the population of Clyde River is under 18. Clyde River is surrounded by fjords that stretch to an ice cap.

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Pedestrian, Iqaluit, Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 20 x24 inches, edition of 9. Iqaluit is the largest city and capital of Nunavut, Canada's northernmost territory. The person shown here is taking a walk along part of Frobisher Bay, still mostly frozen. Iqaluit is on Baffin Island, across the sea from Greenland. The tide there rises and falls dozens of feet daily, causing the huge sea ice chunks, boats, and sleds in the background to gradually rise and fall daily.
Pedestrian, Iqaluit, Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Paper, 20 x24 inches, edition of 9. Iqaluit is the largest city and capital of Nunavut, Canada’s northernmost territory. The person shown here is taking a walk along part of Frobisher Bay, still mostly frozen. Iqaluit is on Baffin Island, across the sea from Greenland. The tide there rises and falls dozens of feet daily, causing the huge sea ice chunks, boats, and sleds in the background to gradually rise and fall daily.

 

Fence Close-up With Sun, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.    The partially frozen sea is shown in the background.  The weather changed frequently from cloudy to sun to drizzle to cloudy during my visit.
Fence Close-up With Sun, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. The partially frozen sea is shown in the background. The weather changed frequently from cloudy to sun to drizzle to cloudy during my visit.

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Zigzag Lead in Ice, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.  As the frozen sea thaws, leads (cracks) of open sea form.  These make travel on the ice by sled, foot, or snowmobile hazardous and dangerous but are part of the annual cycle of the ice's freezing and thawing.  Pond Inlet, population 1,500, at the northern tip of Baffin Island, across from Greenland, is rich in marine life, including seals, beluga, bowhead whales, and narwhal.   Pond Inlet's mayor speaks only Inuktitut and not English.   Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper met with the Mayor in Pond Inlet in August 2014, showing the importance of the region to Canada.
Zigzag Lead in Ice, Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik), Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. As the frozen sea thaws, leads (cracks) of open sea form. These make travel on the ice by sled, foot, or snowmobile hazardous and dangerous but are part of the annual cycle of the ice’s freezing and thawing. Pond Inlet, population 1,500, at the northern tip of Baffin Island, across from Greenland, is rich in marine life, including seals, beluga, bowhead whales, and narwhal. Pond Inlet’s mayor speaks only Inuktitut and not English. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper met with the Mayor in Pond Inlet in August 2014, showing the importance of the region to Canada.

 


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Tile Mosaic And Window, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.  Murmansk is in the extreme northwest corner of Russia near the Arctic Ocean and only about 100 miles from Kirkenes, Norway.  Russia's submarine fleet is based a few miles from Murmansk in a city closed to the public.  Murmansk is the largest city in the Arctic, with more than 300,000 people living there.  It is on a bay which leads to the Arctic Ocean.  It benefits from the Gulf Stream and has ice-free waters.  It also has trees, unlike many Arctic communities.  This image shows a beautifully crafted tile mosaic outside the window.  Russia's great culture has produced influential artists such as photographer Alexander Rodchenko, dancer Rudolf Nureyev, film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky, and contemporary musician Sergey Kuryokhin, among many.
Tile Mosaic And Window, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014 Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. Murmansk is in the extreme northwest corner of Russia near the Arctic Ocean and only about 100 miles from Kirkenes, Norway. Russia’s submarine fleet is based a few miles from Murmansk in a city closed to the public. Murmansk is the largest city in the Arctic, with more than 300,000 people living there. It is on a bay which leads to the Arctic Ocean. It benefits from the Gulf Stream and has ice-free waters. It also has trees, unlike many Arctic communities. This image shows a beautifully crafted tile mosaic outside the window. Russia’s great culture has produced influential artists such as photographer Alexander Rodchenko, dancer Rudolf Nureyev, film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky, and contemporary musician Sergey Kuryokhin, among many.

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BeachedBoat, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, edition of 9.  This boat, beached for all but a few months a year, had a unique beauty and seemingly stoic expression.
BeachedBoat, Clyde River (Kanngiqtugaapik), Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, edition of 9. This boat, beached for all but a few months a year, had a unique beauty and seemingly stoic expression.
Fence, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9.  The clouds in this image seemed mystical and drew my eye.  Snow is still on the ground in late May.
Fence, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 inches, edition of 9. The clouds in this image seemed mystical and drew my eye. Snow is still on the ground in late May.

 


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Tower, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.  This was close to the Port of Murmansk.  Murmansk has proposed that it be one end of an Arctic Bridge, for shipping through the Arctic Ocean.  The other end would be the Hudson Bay in Canada.  If Arctic waters become ice-free for longer periods each year, which is the current trend, this may increasingly be a feasible idea for a new trade route.
Tower, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9. This was close to the Port of Murmansk. Murmansk has proposed that it be one end of an Arctic Bridge, for shipping through the Arctic Ocean. The other end would be the Hudson Bay in Canada. If Arctic waters become ice-free for longer periods each year, which is the current trend, this may increasingly be a feasible idea for a new trade route.

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Playground, Kirkenes, Norway, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.   Kirkenes is in the extreme northeast of Norway, along the Arctic Ocean, and very close to the border with Russia.  It was occupied by Nazi forces during World War II and was almost completely obliterated by bombing as the Allies worked to take it back.   The buildings in Kirkenes are therefore almost all from the 1940s forward even though the town existed long before World War II.  The signs in Kirkenes are in both Norwegian and Russian.  The Russian border next to Kirkenes was the only Cold War border directly shared by a NATO country and the former Soviet Union.   Kirkenes has year-round ice-free waters due to the Jet Stream so it is a shipping hub.  The area north of Kirkenes is planned for future advanced resource exploitation.  Norway is wealthy oil-rich nation.
Playground, Kirkenes, Norway, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9. Kirkenes is in the extreme northeast of Norway, along the Arctic Ocean, and very close to the border with Russia. It was occupied by Nazi forces during World War II and was almost completely obliterated by bombing as the Allies worked to take it back. The buildings in Kirkenes are therefore almost all from the 1940s forward even though the town existed long before World War II. The signs in Kirkenes are in both Norwegian and Russian. The Russian border next to Kirkenes was the only Cold War border directly shared by a NATO country and the former Soviet Union. Kirkenes has year-round ice-free waters due to the Jet Stream so it is a shipping hub. The area north of Kirkenes is planned for future advanced resource exploitation. Norway is wealthy oil-rich nation.

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Reflected Scene, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Reflected Scene, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Man with Machine Parts, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Man with Machine Parts, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.

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Wall Tubes, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Wall Tubes, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Sign, Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Sign, Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.

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Arctic Shore, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Arctic Shore, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.

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Center, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.
Center, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 inches, edition of 9.

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Kayla, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 Inches, Edition of 9.  I met Kayla while I was photographing on the beach of the Arctic Ocean. The ocean was still frozen there in mid-May. Kayla is a skilled artisan, a carver.  Her father is also a carver. Kugluktuk, almost half-way from Spokane to the North Pole, is in Canada's newest and northern-most territory, Nunavut. Nunavut, formed in 1999, means "our land" in the native language. Kugluktuk has a population of 1400. The nearest hospital is a two hour flight away to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. The people of Kugluktuk depend on each other for survival in a harsh environment. The Hunter Trapper Organization of Kugluktuk shares extra whale and seal meat with community members after harvests.
Kayla, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 Inches, Edition of 9. I met Kayla while I was photographing on the beach of the Arctic Ocean. The ocean was still frozen there in mid-May. Kayla is a skilled artisan, a carver. Her father is also a carver. Kugluktuk, almost half-way from Spokane to the North Pole, is in Canada’s newest and northern-most territory, Nunavut. Nunavut, formed in 1999, means “our land” in the native language. Kugluktuk has a population of 1400. The nearest hospital is a two hour flight away to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. The people of Kugluktuk depend on each other for survival in a harsh environment. The Hunter Trapper Organization of Kugluktuk shares extra whale and seal meat with community members after harvests.

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Floating Ice, Coppermine River, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 Inches, Edition of 9.  I was supposed to go on a snowmobile up this river to get photographs further upstream.  Due to the melting conditions of the river the trip was changed to go over the frozen Arctic Ocean to some small islands with hunting cabins and Inukshuks.  Inukshuks are stone cairns that are shaped like a human.  They are built to signify directional aid or to indicate good hunting or fishing locations.
Floating Ice, Coppermine River, Kugluktuk, Nunavut, Canada, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 24 x 20 Inches, Edition of 9. I was supposed to go on a snowmobile up this river to get photographs further upstream. Due to the melting conditions of the river the trip was changed to go over the frozen Arctic Ocean to some small islands with hunting cabins and Inukshuks. Inukshuks are stone cairns that are shaped like a human. They are built to signify directional aid or to indicate good hunting or fishing locations.
Stairwell, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 Inches, Edition of 9.
Stairwell, Murmansk, Russia, from The Far North, Portrait of the Arctic, 2014, Inkjet Print on Hahnemule Fine Art Paper, 20 x 24 Inches, Edition of 9.

 


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